русский
Українська

How Callie and Carter, Siamese twins from the United States, look today, after their mother hid them from people. Photo

What six-year-old Siamese twins Callie and Carter from the USA look like

Siamese twins are quite a rare phenomenon, so spreading the word about people with this mutation is important. This is what Chelsea Torres, a 30-year-old American, is doing. Her Siamese twins, Callie and Carter, live almost like any other normal people. The girls are now 6 years old and go to kindergarten.

The woman used to not show her children to anyone, hiding them in a stroller under a blanket, but now she actively posts interesting moments from her life and photos with her daughters on Facebook to raise awareness of this mutation. The girls are connected by a chest and share a liver, intestinal tract, and bladder, but their hearts and stomachs are different, reports Today.com.

How Callie and Carter, Siamese twins from the United States, look today, after their mother hid them from people. Photo

"When they were babies, it was hard for me. People were watching and taking pictures. In fact, I even broke someone's phone," the woman explained the reason for hiding the children.

Nowadays, Kalli and Carter's life is quite active. "You will see us at the mall and at exhibitions. We are always doing something. In summer, we live near the pond," Chelsea explained.

The mother notes that the most difficult part of caring for Siamese twins is sewing all their clothes. To do this, Chelsea cuts two dresses, shirts or blouses and sews them together to create an outfit for both girls.

How Callie and Carter, Siamese twins from the United States, look today, after their mother hid them from people. Photo

The sisters move around in a wheelchair, learn to walk and coordinate their movements with physiotherapy. Their mother is hopeful for their future. "Yes, they will have difficulties, but I know they will be fine because they have each other," Torres says.

Chelsea notes that the sisters have different personalities: Kallie behaves like a "real girl," while Carter prefers to play video games with her nine-year-old brother. When the girls need to take a break from each other, one puts on headphones and abstracts herself from her twin.

How Callie and Carter, Siamese twins from the United States, look today, after their mother hid them from people. Photo

 

According to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, conjoined twins occur once in every 50,000 to 60,000 births. Most of them are stillborn or die shortly after delivery. Kalli and Carter are completely healthy, so their parents have no plans to separate them. Moreover, the girls have never expressed a desire to be separated, and Chelsea said that they "don't know any other way of life."

How Callie and Carter, Siamese twins from the United States, look today, after their mother hid them from people. Photo

Only verified information is available on the OBOZ.UA Telegram channel and Viber. Do not fall for fakes!

Other News

How to clean the burners of a gas stove: home remedies

How to clean the burners of a gas stove: home remedies

A separate product is provided for cast iron burners
List of indoor plants that require almost no maintenance: options for the lazy ones

List of indoor plants that require almost no maintenance: options for the lazy ones

Even if you don't know how to care for plants, you can grow a stylish winter garden at home
If you don't wear makeup: life hacks for looking stunning without lipstick and blush

If you don't wear makeup: life hacks for looking stunning without lipstick and blush

An important step is high-quality skin cleansing with peeling