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Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

Anna BoklajukNews
An apocalyptic beach cemetery is located deep in the Namibian desert

There is an apocalyptic beach cemetery deep in the Namibian desert. It is called the "Gates of Hell".

The cursed shoreline, once described as "the land God made in anger," was left untouched by the locals and left to fester in dark stories of death and destruction. Broken shipwrecks and rotting human bones lie on the beach, The Sun reports.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

Thousands of washed-up skeletons, broken airplanes and abandoned ships lie off the coast as the ocean tide runs out. The shoreline is known locally as the "end of the world" where sand swallowed up doomed shipwreck victims as their boats crashed through the rough water, abruptly throwing them overboard.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

The ruins of the famous ships date back to 1904. Several ships carried hundreds of unfortunate passengers on board, all of whom make the "Skeleton Coast" their final resting place. The skeletons sit side by side with the remains of animals from a pride of lions to huge elephants.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

The virtually uninhabitable landscape creates a godless and apocalyptic feel as dust storms and thick fogs fill the dry air daily.

The indigenous people of Namibia, called the Bushmen, originally called it "the land God made in anger" after disasters continued to occur. Today the only signs of human life along the strip of desolate land are rotting road signs buried under the sand, abandoned oil rigs left to rot, and the sun-kissed corpses of men, animals, and ships.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

The coast covers the northern part of Namibia's Atlantic coast south of Angola from the Kunene River south to the Swakop River.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

While signs of gruesome death are all around most who wander the shores, wildlife thrives on the beaches. Namibia has also declared 6200 square miles of coastline and deserts as part of the Skeleton Coast National Park, allowing for dune bashing excursions.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

The scenery is so picturesque that the Skeleton Coast was even once recognized as one of the world's best golden beaches by Beach Atlas. The travel website called the land "inhospitable but fascinating" and described it as a perfect example of nature that always outlives man.

Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world
Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world
Gates of Hell: what an apocalyptic beach cemetery in the Namibian desert looks like and why locals call it the end of the world

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