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Extraterrestrial "signal" that alarmed scientists back in 2014 turned out to be something absurd - study

Dmytro IvancheskulNews
The vibrations from the meteorite could have been just a truck passing by the seismometer

The sound waves thought to have come from a meteorite or even a piece of alien spacecraft that were recorded in January 2014 were almost certainly vibrations from a truck. The new discovery by scientists casts further doubt on the sensational find by Harvard physics professor Avi Loeb, who found mysterious spherules at the site of the alleged crash of what he believes to be alien technology.

The discovery is described in the work of scientists from Johns Hopkins University, led by planetary seismologist Benjamin Fernando, Phys.org reports. The findings of the study will be officially presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Houston.

As you know, in January 2014, a meteorite entered the Earth's atmosphere, which according to some sources was an "alien" from outside the solar system, and according to others, a piece of an alien ship.

The object entered the Earth's atmosphere over the western Pacific Ocean and this event was associated with underground vibrations that were recorded at a seismic station on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

Based on these vibrations, Loeb calculated the location of the object's crash and organized an expedition to retrieve the debris from the ocean floor. The spherules, which Loeb considers a cosmic sensation, were discovered, although not everyone agrees with him.

However, now it may turn out that Loeb has fooled himself because, according to Fernando, the scientist was looking for debris in a different place than where the meteorite actually fell.

"The signal (which was recorded on Earth during the meteorite's passage - Ed.) changed direction over time, exactly matching the road that passes by the seismometer," the planetary seismologist said.

He acknowledges that it is difficult to prove that a particular signal does not come from something, but in the case of the January 2014 incident, scientists found that there were many similar signals and "they have all the characteristics we expect from a truck and none of the characteristics we expect from a meteorite."

Fernando emphasizes that all of Loeb's assumptions are based on misinterpreted data, and the meteorite actually entered the atmosphere somewhere else.

"The place where the fireball landed was actually very far from where the oceanographic expedition went to collect these meteorite fragments. Not only were they using the wrong signal, but they were also looking in the wrong place," Fernando emphasized.

In their new study, the scientists used data from stations in Australia and Palau designed to detect sound waves from nuclear tests and calculated a more likely meteorite impact site that is more than 160 kilometers away from the area Loeb studied.

"Whatever was found on the seabed is completely unrelated to this meteor, regardless of whether it was a natural space rock or a piece of alien spacecraft, although we strongly suspect that it was not aliens," Fernando summarized.

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