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Russians know how to 'sell themselves': Dasha Volha, who lives abroad, explained the weakening support for Ukraine in the world

Actress Volha: 'We need a different strategy'

Ukrainian actress Dasha Volha (Late Repentance, Waiting List, My Girls, A House with Other People's Secrets, After Winter, The Ex), who moved to New Zealand with her husband 20 years ago, shared insights into how people abroad are currently reacting to the news of the war in Ukraine. The actress laments the diminishing attention to Ukraine's problems.

Dasha Volha conveyed this in an interview with OBOZ.UA. The actress, actively working to maintain foreign awareness of Ukraine's challenges, emphasizes the need for alternative methods to garner global support in the war against the Russians.

"When the major conflict started, New Zealand actively organized events," says Dasha Volha. "We even held several film festivals. People attended, actively participated and contributed. We were invited for interviews on TV and radio. I visited schools and spoke to children about what was happening in Ukraine. Now, everything has quieted down. We've faded from the front pages."

Russians know how to 'sell themselves': Dasha Volha, who lives abroad, explained the weakening support for Ukraine in the world

"I believe we need a different strategy. We must cease portraying ourselves solely as victims of this war," the actress elaborates. "Because the war is ongoing, and people grow weary of sympathizing. It's futile to resent a world facing a different situation. Forcing them to live with our traumas is equally futile. For instance, when we screened the film Bad Roads by Natalka Vorozhbyt here, New Zealanders left the audience admitting that their psyche couldn't handle it, and that it was difficult to watch. They couldn't endure it for an hour. Hence, we require alternative methods to garner their support.

"In this regard, I must say Russia is very inventive," Volha continues. "We need to change as well. In simpler terms, we need to 'sell' ourselves to the world. We need to be interesting, competitive, and attractive. We should make people desire to be associated with Ukrainian culture and its people. Yes, we are victims, but we must grit our teeth and offer the world something it lacks. While Russians persistently impose their culture aggressively, no one is planning to discontinue it here, to be honest. We need to boldly proclaim our depth, unique space, and beauty."

Russians know how to 'sell themselves': Dasha Volha, who lives abroad, explained the weakening support for Ukraine in the world

"I am currently conveying the sentiments of people abroad who can assist us financially. They are doing so, but their enthusiasm is slowly waning—I can see where things are heading," adds the artist. "We need to be more inventive, flexible, and smarter than merely portraying ourselves as war victims in need of help. That's the message from here. I would also like to emphasize that the support for Ukraine in New Zealand is still quite robust. I am invited to charity events where funds are raised. Wealthy New Zealanders want to make a positive impact. They understand which side is right."

Earlier, OBOZ.UA wrote where the actress disappeared and where she now lives, Dasha Volha who met the invasion in Moscow, where she came to get a Russian passport.

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